Come and Find Me by Hallie Ephron


Come and Find Me by Hallie Ephron

Click the link to purchase your copy of Come and Find Me from Amazon.com.

Author: Hallie Ephron
Publisher: William Marrow
Copyright Date: 2011
Foundational Characters: Diana Highsmith, Ashley Highsmith, Daniel Schechter, Dr. Pamela David-Braverman, and Jake
Standard Rating: Y+
Reviewer Rating: 2 Stars
Available Formats: Hardcover, Kindle
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0061857521
ISBN-13: 978-0061857522
Book Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.1 x 1.3 inches
Page Count: 288
Genre: Fiction
Sub-Genre: Action, Suspense, Thriller, Technology, Adventure
Tags: Fiction, Action, Suspense, Thriller, Technology, Adventure, Kidnapping, Drugs, Alcohol

Description

“It takes a lot of chutzpah for a book reviewer to write books of her own….But Hallie Ephron…can hold her head high: She does it, and very well, too.”

—Seattle Times

A recluse who works and lives online must brave the “real world” when her sister goes missing in Come and Find Me—a gripping and ingenious novel of mystery and psychological suspense from Hallie Ephron, author of Never Tell a Lie. Writing about her sensational debut, USA Today noted, “You can imagine Hitchcock curling up with this one.” Aficionados of Rear Window, Vertigo, and North by Northwest—as well as the many fans of Harlan Coben and Mary Higgins Clark—will get a similar charge from Come and Find Me.

Computer security expert and reformed hacker Diana Highsmith has not ventured beyond her home for more than a year—not since that fateful climbing vacation in Switzerland took Daniel’s life. Haunted by the sound of Daniel’s cries echoing across the gorge as he fell, Diana cannot stop thinking about the life they’ll never have—grief that has transformed her into a recluse.

Diana doesn’t have to shut herself off com­pletely from the world, though; she and Daniel’s best friend run a thriving Internet security company. From her home, in her pajamas, Diana assesses security breaches, both potential and real, and offers clients a way to protect themselves from hackers—the kind of disruptions Diana herself used to create. Once Diana has a game plan she is able to meet with clients in OtherWorld, an Internet-based platform, using Nadia, an avatar she created for herself. Diana knows she’ll have to rejoin the “real world” eventually, but right now a few steps from her door each morning is all she can handle.

When Diana’s sister goes missing, however, she is forced to do the impossible: brave both the outside world and her own personal demons to find her sister. As one step outside leads to another, Diana soon discovers that she is following a trail fraught with danger—and uncovering a web of deceit and betrayal, both online and real-life, that threatens not only her sister’s life, but her own. (From the publisher’s website)

The Revelation

This story is about a woman named Diana who suffers from a bad case of post traumatic stress disorder and anxiety after witnessing the death of her boyfriend, Daniel, while ice climbing in Switzerland. Accompanied by Jake, Daniel’s best friend, Diana goes home and tries to pick up the pieces of her life, goes through counseling, and locks herself in the home she grew up in as a child. She turns that home into a fortress, adding multiple forms of redundant security so she will somehow feel “safe.”

Diana, Daniel, and Jake are hackers; somewhat reformed hackers. They used to hack into computer systems for the thrill of it. Then they hacked into a hospital computer system, scrambled some data, and helped kill an innocent person. After that, Diana wanted out of that business and suggested to Daniel and Jake that they clean up their act, go straight, and try to help rid the digital world of people like themselves. Then Daniel died. However, with the urging of Jake, Diana used a life insurance settlement to help Jake start a business called Gamelan.

Then Diana’s sister Ashley goes missing and Diana’s world is turned upside down—yet again. She calls on her sisters friends for help locating her sister, but to no avail. Diana spends a lot of her time in a place called Other World, an internet-based version of the real world. She calls on her Other World friends to help and they come through. Then she uncovers a secret she wasn’t supposed to know about—ever. When she gets too close to finding out the truth behind the lies, she is kidnapped, too.

On the surface, this is a run-of-the-mill mystery story. There are lies, and mystery, and intrigue. Even a little bit of investigative work. But the plot is weak and the story-telling is as dry as a desert-exposed carcass. The end of a story is one of the most critical parts, and to say that the end of Come and Find Me is lack-luster adds too much shine to an otherwise dull tale. I’m always glad to finish a book, simply because I love reading books. I also read for the sheer pleasure of reading. Gaining something from a story makes it even better. This story didn’t teach me anything. I came away from it having learned nothing; my life was completely unaffected. My life isn’t worse off after reading the book, but it also wasn’t improved.

So, my overall conclusion of Come and Find Me is that it wasn’t good. It was just okay. If this title is on your reading list, drop it down to the bottom and get to it when you get to it. There are better books out there to read first.

Characteristics

Contains mild language, inappropriate drug use, alcohol use, and thematic elements inappropriate for children under 15 years old.

Click the link to purchase your copy of Come and Find Me from Amazon.com.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Action, Adventure, Detective, Fiction, Hallie Ephron, Mystery, Suspense, Thriller and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s